My Mother, My Bookcover …

In the Beginning…

…there was a painting. Several in fact. I do a lot of art in various media—jewelry, pottery, graphic art, drawing…but I do not paint a lot. My mother did, though. I grew up with oil paint. The odors of turpentine and linseed oil brings back happy memories of my childhood.

My house is full of her paintings—from the Realism of the 1950s, the Abstract Art of the 1970s…Landscapes in the 1980s, and in the 1990s she switched to watercolor and went all in for Abstract Realism, or Real Abstractions.

Before Watercolor and after Oil Paint, acrylic paint showed up, thanks to Ives Klein’s International Blue and a French chemist revolutionizing paint. Mom tossed her oil paints over her shoulder and never looked back.

Church in Golden, New Mexico

My mother and I did some art together—as in sitting side-by-side drawing. We’d go out east of the Sandia Mountains that overlooks my childhood home of Albuquerque, and draw the weathered shacks and corrals and the old church just off the highway in Golden whose existence came about through a brief history in (wait for it!) a brief history of gold mining.

We also liked to stop up the road in Madrid  (pronounced MAD-rid), and sketch the old houses built during the coal boom that had lasted til the 1950s. Almost everyone moved out, Madrid became a sparsely populated ghost town among the ruins of the old houses built during its heyday. (Or is it “hayday”?)

Miner’s Cabins, Madrid, NM

The old houses were interesting to sketch, while imagining the ghosts that might still be there. Anymore Madrid is a tourist town—all the houses that weren’t falling down have been renovated, and people live in them, as well as operate coffee shops and art galleries out of them.
The film, Wild Hogs was filmed in and around Madrid…

In the 1950s, my mother, Rita M. Simmons, named the highway that we drove to get to Golden and Madrid. It was Highway 10, name changed to Highway 14, and now is Highway 337. But the highway  through Golden, Madrid, and its sister tiny town with a copper mining history, Cerrillos further up the road, comprise what has been known since the 50s as the Turquoise Trail.
She won a set of luggage.

Ok, then…where am I? Oh–yes, my book cover.

If not for my mother, I may not have painted it. If not for my mother, I may not have done any of the artwork that has informed my life on Earth.
Corvus Rising’s book cover is not all paint, however. It’s more a multi-media event featuring watercolor, ink drawing, clip art, and of course Photoshop.

I painted the background of Wilder Island, and the river at sunset. Or sunrise. With the dark forests reflected in the water. There were several attempts. I cut them up and made bookmarks out of them. Here’s what made the cut, in its original form:

Untitled-1

Then the crows came. After the old hermit, Maxmillian Wilder died on Halloween in 1937, thousands of crows and ravens flew in a circle above the island, in mourning. A local photographer, Frederick T. Nelson, snapped the photo and titled it Murder of Crows. In Alfredo Manzi’s time, the photo hung in the Ledford Library.

In my time, I scanned the watercolor painting, hauled it into Photoshop and applied a gazillion actual clip-art crows and ravens flying in a circle above the island. This is the banner image on my Corvus Rising Facebook page.
Adobe Photoshop PDF

Next, in Photoshop, I altered a photograph of a tree, and added corvids–also via altering a photograph and copying it a bunch of times. Like 13. That’s how many corvids are in the Great Corvid Council
WithTree_AndCrows

And now the text…

Publishers have all sorts of rules about book covers—things like how large the font can be on the spine, how much room the fold will take up, and arcane things like slug and bleed—which have to do with the margins around the actual size of the cover. It’s good to pay mind to that so that important things like the last letters of your title or an important part of the cover art doesn’t get chopped off at the printers.

Fortunately, the publishers provide this information and there are many sources to find templates so that cover art and text where you want them. Here’s some screen shots of the guidelines that I used to layout my book cover in Photoshop.

AllCoverText
Front Cover and Spine Text……………………Back Cover Text added…………………Barcode, Publisher’s icon added

In Photoshop, I just typed what I wanted—the Title, or my name, or the back cover text— in a layer over the cover art. And I moved it around and played with fonts and sizes and places until it looked “right”.
It’s tricky to have a complex book cover with lots of colors and make the text show up. So I had to do things like fade out a portion of the spine so the title would be readable; make a separate line of text in a different color over the island on the back cover so it would show up.

For Paperbacks, a Barcode is required, which you get when buy an ISBN# (don’t!—unless you plan on writing a whole bunch of books. One is pricey, and though there’s a price break at 10, it’s still a hundred or so bucks…and 10 is likely more books than I will probably write). Amazon will give an ISBN# and its barcode for free–they buy them by the thousands so one of these things are essentially free to them too.

eBooks do not need barcodes, but like print books, need to have an ISBN#….which gives info on price, who the publisher is, where the book was published, etc. ISBN means International Standard Book Number, and has nothing whatsoever to do with author’s ownership of books… <more about isbn’s here>

Lastly I placed the Barcode (there’s rules about barcodes too…how big, where to place, etc), my webpage address, and a little mouse, for “Ecofantasy Press”–which is my own privately owned publishing company.
That’s one cool thing about self-publishing…being your own publishing company. Not to be confused with who actually physically produces the book in print.

The Whole Enchilada…

Adobe Photoshop PDF

BY THE WAY….I am on the downward side of finishing Book 2, by the way, after 7 years…

Copyright

Quartz: the Series – Part 2

Don’t we all love crystals? the bigger the better?

Not always…sometimes the smallest things are of exquisite beauty.

Microcrystalline Quartz..the Wee Ones

Agates and Jasper are both fine example of Microcrystalline Quartz with spectacularly beautiful patterns and color.

Many people are asking …what is the difference between Agates and Jaspers?

Texture, baby…Texture

And what you may ask is ‘texture’?
Patterns of spheres, spots, banding and mineral alignment or layering.

Laguna Lace Agate

Agates are banded or show some sort of layering, like the one below…and often translucent.
Jaspers are opaque (no light will penetrate the surface) and are generally not banded

Some folks lump both jasper as a variety of agate. Not me, however…

Some agates are not exactly layered and some jaspers are somewhat banded. And some agates and jaspers have coarsely crystalline quartz within their tiny landscapes of micro-crystals.

Druzy Lace Agate

Like just about all else in Geology and life in general, the boundary is not razor-sharp but fuzzy and indistinct and we scratch or heads asking, “is it agate or is it jasper?”

One must learn to live with ambiguity.

 

By the way…those little circular textures in Lace Agate and Ocean Jasper are actually 3-dimensional spheres. What we see in the cut stone are cross-sections through the spheres. Overall, this texture is known to geologists as ‘botryoidal’, a term derived from the Greek word “botruoeidēs”, which means “bunch of grapes”.

Ocean Jasper

Lace Agate

It’s all Chalcedony...

Botryoidal Grape Agate

BUT, chalcedony need not be botryoidal, nor layered or banded. Nor is the botryoidal texture limited to chalcedony (e.g. Malachite, Hematite, etc)

So, where do these delicious chalcedony rocks form? Generally in weathering volcanic (e.g. Ocean Jasper…this article is a MUST! -if only for the drop-dead gorgeous pictures), and sedimentary rocks, whether or not the original rock had a lot of silica.
Occasionally chalcedony is found as a petrifying agent in fossils.

As in Dinosaur Bones…
At left is a “gemstone” dinosaur bone cabochon. In the Beginning, Dino bones were made of the same stuff as our bones—largely calcium. After death and extreme burial in the presence of silica and water, the calcium and other bone minerals are replaced with Chalcedony (the whitish and pinkish areas of the stone).

The image below is generally what a dinosaur bone looks like in a thin (30 micron) sections of a rock under polarized light. See Petrographic Microscope.

The image shows a “highly porous structure, with pores filled with late chalcedony, and the fossil remnants of the bone tissue, where black dots used to host a single bone cell. A larger void on the lower left was filled with fine quartz sand. Width of view: 5.3 mm.
Credit: Bernardo Cesare, Department of Geosciences, University of Padova, Padova, Italy”

Note: the cabochon of the gemstone dinosaur bone shown above is NOT the same rock as is shown in the photomicrograph, but the two are similar enough to show the chalcedony, regardless of the dino bone it replaced!

Chalcedony, of the Many Colored Flavors

All the agates and jaspers, plus the gemstones Carnelian, Aventurine, Chrysoprase, Onyx, Moss Agate, Dendrite

Rock on, everyone!

yours, in Quartz
-mary

Quartz: the Series

The α- Alpha  and the β- Beta

The Science & Art of Quartz.

SiO2

Our most beloved gemstone, in its myriad forms…Eleven crystalline and 2 non-crystalline minerals comprise silica (SiO2), though Quartz is the most common form. In our landscapes, in our lives…
Twelve percent of Earth’s surface is quartz, and a full 20% of the whole crust is quartz.

 

Geologists have plotted the various forms of SiO2  over the years, culminating in the diagram to the left.

MySiOinterests these days, and most of my life actually, lie in the blue and pink  areas on the diagram:  α-quartz and β-quartz, respectively.

α-Alpha and β-beta quartz occur in all igneous, metamorphic and sedimentary rock types. Within the alpha and beta fields lie a seemingly vast array of different rock types, all of which comprise quartz.

 

Beautiful enough for gemstones. Revered since antiquity. The ancient Egyptians were gifted artisans whose use of blood-red Carnelian—one of the Quartz gemstones—is iconic and legendary.

It’s ALL Quartz…

Trace elements (e.g. iron) produce the colors we see in all forms of Quartz, though it is not color but size and  translucency that are the keys to the Classification of Quartz.

From Large to Small…Macro to Micro to Crypto. Size matters not only in how quartz gemstones are classified, but how they come to display the endless and gorgeous variation in color and patterns of spheres,  bands and layers–whether smooth or crenulated. And why we love these humble stones more than diamonds.

Today, it’s all about Macro. Following are a few examples of the flavors of Quartz whose crystals are large enough to see without magnification. Tomorrow, the small stuff.

Macrocrystalline: Crystals are easily identified without magnification.

These Amethyst crystals are an example of Macrocrystalline Quartz.

The crystals do not have to be whole, perfect and complete like these. Some Quartz is quite coarsely crystalline yet do not display the crystal habit of the mineral.

 

 

Rose Quartz is a type of Macrocrystalline Quartz that does not form crystal faces, but is composed of many intergrown crystal ‘sub-individuals’

Citrine

Second most popular Quartz gemstone…Amethyst is first.

 

 

 

Ametrine

A naturally occurring variety of Macrocrystalline Quartz comprising zones of Amethyst intergrown with zones of Citrine.

 

 

 

Ametrine cut perpendicular to the c-axis of the crystal. Is that freaking cool or what???

 

Quartz crystal axes: 

Macro…Micro…Crytpo…it’s ALL Quartz.
Versatile, beautiful, ornamental

Carnelian Pendant wrapped in Copper wire.
(and yes, Carnelian is one of the many lovely flavors of quartz, of the Microcrystalline Quartz variety)

Find this and more or my work with the Gifts of the Earth here:
https://etsy.me/2Mobjji

And my Facebook page MCS Artworks

Thank you…

Coming Soon: Microcrystalline Quartz

 

 

References:
Ametrine    https://www.mindat.org/min-7606.html
Ametrine    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ametrine
The Mineral Citrine    https://www.minerals.net/mineral/citrine.aspx
The Mineral Quartz   https://www.minerals.net/mineral/quartz.aspx
The Quartz Page     http://www.quartzpage.de/crs_intro.html